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Posts Tagged ‘fly patterns’

I would not find myself catching very many of thesePT, on Reverse Creek, June Lake loop, CA…1954…

If I did not, in due course, invest some time in reading and learning what some of the great tiers are up to. Skip Morris is one of my favorites. His new book, which came out in late 2009, caught my eye the other day, as I was browsing my local Fly Shop. I would highly recommend his most current read to anyone that is interested ,in what he, and a batch of other talented tiers (new and old) have offered up. A two hour tying DVD rounds out the book package…

“TROUT FLIES FOR RIVERS”, Skip and Carol Ann Morris…

One may peruse the book HERE:


Now, I gotta’ get back to playing with the bugs…

Stirring things up in Reverse Creek with my brother, Greg…

PT/TB

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These are two interesting dubbing materials that I use when creating some of my fly patterns:

SLF PRISM:

SLF Prism Dubbing. No Description Available
ZELON DUBBING BRF
and Zelon Dubbing:
ZELON DUBBING BRF
ZELON DUBBING BRF
SLF Prism was introduced in 2007 by Wapsi and Zelon dubbing is only available through Blue Ribbon Flies in West Yellowstone.
SLF Prism has found its’ way into many of the classic attractor nymphs or searching flies I tie. Zelon dubbing was developed by Craig Matthews, in many colors, to match the insects in Yellowstone National Park and in the surrounding areas. I use SLF Prism for the thorax on the Dean Endress ROBO PT nymph.
ROBO PT
Dean’s ROBO PT NYMPH…Dean ties it bushy, using mixed Lite Brite for the thorax…
PT/TB :toast:


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Side # 1…

I was going through my inventory of Fly Boxes the other day and happened upon my first nymph box. I purchased this box at Chuck Fothergill’s in Aspen, CO back in 1975. George Odier helped me stock it – that was before I tied on the road on a regular basis…

 

Side # 2…

Almost all  of these patterns still work in certain situations…I have always been attracted to Richard Wheatley boxes…

PT/TB

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Hot Creek Ranch is situated off Hwy. 395 – East of the Mammoth Lakes Airport. My first visit to the ranch was in Mid September 1976. After returning from my extended trip to Aspen, I had resumed my career in the entertainment industry, joining with two twin brothers to start a new public relations firm on Sunset Blvd. I needed a fly fishing fix.

Hot Creek at sunset…

We arrived on early a Thursday morning. Fall was in the air and a fresh frost covered the ground in front of our cabin. Ilse and Nadia came for leisure and horseback riding. I came for the fish.

Dry fly fishing with single barbless hooks is the code on this property. To insure adherence to this rule, a crusty old codger rode a beat up motorcycle with spongy suspension on twice-daily rounds along the trail next to the creek, monitoring every fisherman.

A small store at the ranch sold limited angling supplies and flies that were created for this water. I purchased several small dry fly patterns in sizes 18 & 20. None of my choices were particularly effective. I had tied some skating spider patterns consisting of a tail and two oversized hackles attached to a short shank dry fly hook with the convex sides of the hackles facing each other at mid hook. After giving up on the flies I had bought and increasingly frustrated by the blustery afternoon wind, I tied one of my creations (thanks Ed Hewitt) to the end of a 12 ft. knotless, 5x leader and to that attached a tippet of 18 inches ( grease this puppy!) and one of the flies in a ginger color. I began casting down stream and downwind with my Leonard.

Some Dry Flies I have collected and tied through the years for Hot Creek…

As the leader and fly bounced up and down over the surface of the stream, I positioned myself so that the line, leader and fly lifted and dropped inches from the opposite bank. Within moments, a rocket smashed through the surface film and engulfed the offering. I watched as a hefty Brown raced downstream and cart wheeled in the air. On the strike, the fish had solidly hooked itself. I palmed the reel quickly as my line played out only then realizing that I had set my drag far too lightly. The tippet held and within a minute I brought the struggling eighteen incher to hand on the near bank. I immediately released the fish and prepared myself for what I believed was going to be an epic afternoon.

I would like to report that I caught numerous Trout of gargantuan proportions that day. However, as it played out, I raised an infinitely larger number of fish than I was able to hook. In any case, it was one of the most memorable days of my early fly-fishing experiences.

Another view of the Ranch at Hot Creek…

When the wind is blowing on moving water anywhere, I generally spend some quality time with the spider. …(or Hewitt’s Neversink Skater)

Nadia and Ilse at Hot Creek…

nadia-hot-creek-2-dwn-sz-1976

Nadia with Pop’s Winston Fiberglass, 7’6′, 4WT Rod, Hot Creek Ranch…

Looking down the Creek towards the canyon where the public water is located…

PT/TB

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